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CFC-FAO-ICIMOD project on
“Medicinal Plants and Herbs: Developing Sustainable Supply Chain and Enhancing Rural Livelihood in Eastern Himalayas”

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1. Project Title:   Medicinal Plants and Herbs (MEDHP) in Eastern Himalayas: Developing Sustainable Supply Chain and Enhancing Rural Livelihood in Eastern Himalayas

2. Duration:  48 months

3. Project Locations: Western Region of Nepal; Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) of Bangladesh; and High Altitude regions of Bhutan plus the national and regional market centres in India.

4. Nature of the Project:  The project is a blend of conservation of medicinal and aromatic plant (MAP) resources through sustainable utilisation, streamlining of supply chain with quality medicinal plants raw materials and expansion of economic opportunities for the rural poor. It focuses on improving livelihoods of highland communities in three needy countries of eastern Himalayas: Bangladesh, Bhutan & Nepal by targeting nine high-values, native and commercial MAP species having large export market demand. The target species include Asparagus racemosus, Phyllanthus emblica, Rauvolfia serpentine and Withania somnifera in Bangladesh, Nardostachys grandiflora, Neopicrorhiza scrophulariiflora, Piper longum and Podophyllum hexandrum in Bhutan and Nardostachys grandiflora, Swertia chirayita, Valeriana jatamansii, Zanthoxylum armatum and Sapindus mukorossi in Nepal. The project will develop and promote appropriate production and post harvest technologies, develop marketing strategies, develop community-based enterprises, promote market information dissemination systems and
appropriate policies to enhance livelihoods and conserve the natural resource base. The project will develop strategies and recommendations to harmonize regional standards and protocols to improve quality, and control the use of fake products and substitutes in the market through interventions including enabling policies, legal reforms, stricter regulatory mechanism and technology transfer. This will strengthen the marketing skills and bargaining power of locally owned MAP-based micro-enterprises and producers’ associations in the region and provides viable and sustainable income generating options to
local communities. The project will develop and promote models of good practice in niche-based transformation and development of resource poor producer communities to improve livelihoods and reduce poverty in the highlands and remote valleys of the three beneficiary countries.

5. Brief Description: 

The overall objective of the project is to conserve natural resources, reduce poverty and improve livelihoods of mountain communities through the sustainable development and utilization of high-value, low-volume medicinal plants & products.
 
The specific objectives of the project are to:

a) to increase incomes of MAP producers by 20% by designing local, national and regional interventions through critical assessment of community needs, information, knowledge and resource base of medicinal herbs sector in the needy countries;
b) To develop and/or strengthen 3 improved supply chains of herbal commodity involving collectors, cultivators, and producers to better access national, regional and international markets;

c) To promote enabling policies, institutions and market infrastructures to increase private sector investment by 25% and setting up quality standards and protocols to develop model public-private-civil society partnership.
 
The project will have three interconnected components that have been determined based on the needs expressed by the stakeholders in each country, nature of current issues and problems faced by the MAP sector in general and the maximum potential of supporting poverty alleviation efforts in the target countries.

The project components are:

a) Situation analysis and Baseline assessments

b) Improved Management of Supply Chains and

c) Policy legal and administrative reforms.

In order to develop a focussed approach on backward and forward linkages component two has been divided into two sub components:

IIa Production enhancement and producer market linkages and

IIb Processing and Marketing through Value Addition

All the activities and components will be carried out in the three target beneficiary countries and the scales and intensities will depend on the expressed needs of the country concerned, existing stage of development of the commodity chain, the absorbing capacity of the stakeholders and enabling environment prevalent in the project areas.  Most of the component activities listed will be carried out in the rural areas by involving the collectors, producers and local processors.
 
The project will be implemented through a 4-tier decentralized organization and management structure involving CFC at the top, followed by the supervisory body, ICIMOD-MAPPA and the implementing agencies at the bottom. Funds will flow from CFC to ICIMOD-MAPPA, which will then distribute to the implementing partners in the three countries. The direct beneficiaries of the project will mainly be the poor and marginalized mountain and rural farmers, collectors and MAP dependent communities. The project will also benefit the MAP promoting CBOs, Government agencies, NGOs and traders in other countries of the region by providing access to research outputs, information database, new institutional arrangements, and market linkages.

The expected outcomes of the project are

a) At least 20% increase in the incomes of MAP producers directly through project interventions;

b) Producer groups elevated to at least 20%-25% in the value chain through efficient supply chain management and value added technologies and profit margins per kg of MAPs produced/traded increased by 10%

c) Productive employment of landless poor in the MAP sub-sectors increase by 15%.

d) Direct linkages with buyers leading to an increased supply of standardized and quality raw materials from producer groups managed enterprises capturing between 10%-20% of the national, regional and international market demand for the selected products from the pilot project locations;

e) Production of MAPs from cultivated sources increase by 10 to 15% aiding environmental conservation and sustainable development of MAP commodities;

f) Funding from public and private sources on the MAP sub sector through market led interventions for livelihood improvement and poverty reduction increase by 30%.

g) Funding from public and private sources on the MAP sub sector through a market led interventions for livelihood improvement and poverty reduction increase by 15-20%;

h) Improved access to productive assets, and MAP-based health care facilities by the rural poor,

i) Increased national, regional and global awareness of MAPs and their sustainable utilisation and a model of good practice for poverty reduction of the rural upland poor;

j) Development of a comprehensive regional trade database covering product volume, price, list of whole sale and retail traders, processing companies and export& import trends.      

6.  Estimated Total Cost:  The estimated total cost of the project is USD 2306689

7.  Financing Sought from the Fund: USD 1681515 

8. Mode of Financing: Grant

9.  Co-financing through International Development Research Centre (IDRC) & ICIMOD – USD 470600

10. Mode of Co-financing: Grant (component III and staff time)

11. Counterpart Contribution:      ICIMOD/MAPPA – USD 470600 (cash & kind)
                                                   Stakeholders – USD 80,700 (Land, producer groups monitoring and protection of assets).
                                                   Total Cash & Kind Contributions – USD 551300

12. Project Executing Agency: The International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD)

13. Supervisory Body: FAO Intergovernmental Sub-Group on Tropical Fruits

14. Estimated Starting Date: 1st October 2005

THE BASIC TECHNICAL INFORMATION ON THE PROPOSED 12 SPECIES OF PLANTS OF THIS PROJECT

1. Sapindus mukorossi Gaertn.

Family: Sapindaceae

Common names:  English: Soap-nut
                           Nepali: Ritha
                           Hindi: Ritha, Reetha, Aritha, Dodan, Kanmar
                           Sanskrit: Phenila, Urista

Distribution: Himalaya, North East India, Myanmar, Indo-China, China, Taiwan, Korea, Japan.
Climate/vegetation zone: TR-ST (600-1200m)
Habit: Medium-sized tree
Habitat: Tropical - sub-tropical broad-leaved forests.

Trade name: Ritha
Part used: Fruits     

Traditional medicinal uses: Fruits expectorant, used in chlorosis, epilepsy and in salivation.

Other uses: Pericarp is used as a detergent, in cleaning woolen and silk cloths, ornaments and also to wash head.

Substitution: Substituted by/with fruits of Acacia sinuata (Lour.) Merrill

Agro-techniques:
The plant is propagated from seeds and stem cuttings. Seedlings are grown in nurseries and transplanted. Due to hard nature of the seed-coat, the seeds need to be kept in water for about a week and well irrigated after sowing. Germination usually takes place between 4-6 weeks. Seedlings are transplanted to the field preferably during the rainy season, or well irrigated after transplantation.

For raising plants from the stem cuttings, thumb-sized branches of healthy plants are cut into pieces of 12-15 cm each that includes at least three nodes, and planted in nurseries. The saplings develop root within 2-5 months after which they are transplanted in the field. The distance between plants is usually maintained at 3-5m.

Methods of harvest: Fruits are usually hand-picked, rarely fruiting branches are cut to harvest.

Primary processing: Freshly picked fruits are sun-dried.

Principal constituents: Pericarp is rich in saponin, Seeds yield a fatty acid.

Principal threats: Destruction of trees for other purposes like construction works, preparation of furniture, agricultural implements, etc. 

2. Swertia chirayita (Roxb. ex Fleming) Karsten

Family: Gentianaceae

Synonyms:  Gentiana chirayita Roxb. ex Fleming
                  Gentiana chirata Wall.
                  Gentiana cherayta Roxb. 
                  Swertia chirata (Wall.) C.B Clarke

Common names: English: Chiretta
                          Nepali: Chiraito, Tite
                          Hindi: Chirayata
                          Sanskrit: Kirattikta, Kirat

Distribution: Kashmir to Bhutan, NE India.
Climate/vegetation zone: ST-TM (1500-2500m)
Habit: Biennial herb, up to 1m tall
Habitat: Open forest and hill slopes.
Trade name: Chirata, Chiraito
Part used: Whole plant

Traditional medicinal properties and uses: Tonic, stomachic, laxative, antipyretic, anthelmintic, antimalarial, antidiarrhoeal, etc.

Other uses: Plant is used to extract a dye.

Adulteration and substitution: Many other Swertia species, notably  S. alata (Royle ex D. Don) C.B. Clarke, S. angustifolia Buch.-Ham. ex D. Don, S. bimaculata (Sieb. & Zucc.) C.B. Clarke, S. ciliata (D.Don ex G. Don) B.L Burtt, S. paniculata Wall., etc., and Andrographis paniculata Nees.

 

 

Agro-techniques:

The plant is propagated from seeds. Seeds are sown in the well-prepared nursery beds during May-June. After 3 months, when the seedlings attain the size of about 15 cm in the nursery beds, are transplanted to the field. Moist and well drained loamy soil with humus and the pH ranging between 4.0 and 6.6 are considered most suitable. During transplantation, the distances between two rows and between two plants are recommended to be 40 cm and 30 cm, respectively.
The plants are matured and ready for the harvest after 2 years in the field. They should be harvested just after the seeds mature and before they disperse. The plants are mostly uprooted to harvest, shed-dried, seeds collected and made into bundles before packed or dispatched.

Principal constituents: A bitter substance chiratin, amarogentin, amaroswerin, and ophelic acid.

Principal threats: Commercial harvesting, over harvesting, destructive harvesting, pre-mature harvesting, etc.

  
3. Valeriana jatamansii Jones  

Family: Valerianaceae

Common synonyms: Valeriana spica Vahl
                               Valeriana villosa Wall.
                               Valeriana wallichii DC.
                               Nardostachys jatamansi (Jones) DC.

Common names: English: Indian valerian
                          Nepali: Sugandhawal, Samayo, Simjadi
                          Hindi: Mushkbala, Tagar
                          Sanskrit: Tagara

Distribution: Afghanistan, Kashmir to Bhutan, North East India, Myanmar, West and Central China.
Climate/vegetation zone: ST-TM (1500-3200m)
Habit: Perennial herb
Habitat: Forest, shrubberies and open slopes
Trade name: Sugandhawal, Samayo, Tagar
Part used: Root and rootstock 

Traditional medicinal uses: Root and rhizome- carminative, sedative, applied to relieve headache and to cure boils and wounds.

 

 

Other uses: Roorstock used as incense.

Substitution: Sometimes substituted for Nardostachys jatamansi DC.
Adulteration: Commercial material often contains root and rhizome of Valeriana hardwickii Wall and other Valeriana spp.

Agro-techniques:

The plant is propagated from seeds, rhizome cuttings and leaves with petiole. Seeds are kept in water for 12-18 hours before sowing. Seeds are sown in the nursery with sandy-loam soil, moist surface covered with a shed during May-June. The seedlings can be transplanted after about a month.

Plants can also be propagated from the rhizome cuttings. Mostly, during the harvest, about 20-30% the upper portion of the rhizome is kept in the soil for regeneration.

The plant can also be propagated from the petioled leaves. Mature leaves with petiole are transplanted in the loose soil, well-irrigated and shaded. The petioles bear roots in about two weeks. These are transplanted to the field, if grown in a nursery.

After 3 months, when the seedlings attain the size of about 15 cm in the nursery beds, are transplanted to the field. Moist and well drained loamy soil with humus and the pH ranging between 4.0 and 6.0 are considered most suitable. During transplantation, the distances between two rows and between two plants are recommended to be 40 cm and 30 cm, respectively.

Methods of harvest:  Plants are uprooted to harvest underground parts.

Primary processing: Root and rhizome are cleaned, cut into moderate pieces and shade-dried, occasionally sun-dried.

Principal constituents: Essential oil.

Principal threats: Commercial harvesting, excessive exploitation, destructive harvesting, habitat destruction, etc.

Conservation measures: Government of Nepal’s Forest Act 1993 has prohibited the export of unprocessed root.

 
4. Zanthoxylum armatum DC.

Family: Rutaceae

Synonyms: Zanthoxylum alatum Roxb.
                    Zanthoxylum hostile Wall.
                   Zanthoxylum violaceum Wall.

Common names: English: Prickly ash, Nepal pepper
                          Nepali: Timur
                          Hindi: Tumra, Tejbal
                          Sanskrit: Tumburu

Distribution: Kashmir to Bhutan, N. India, China, Taiwan, Philippines.
Climate/vegetation zone: ST-TM (1000-2500m) 
Habit: Spinous shrub or small tree
Habitat: Shrubberies, open forests, cultivated areas.

Trade name: Timur, Tomar
Part used: Fruits     

Traditional medicinal uses: Fruits - carminative, stomachic and anthelmintic, in dyspepsia, fever and toothache.

Other uses: Fruit used as a spice, fruits and bark used to intoxicate fish.

Adulteration/substitution/: Often substituted by Z. acanthopodium DC., Z. hamiltonianum Wall., etc.

Agro-techniques:
The plant is propagated from seeds and stem cuttings. Fairly washed seeds are sown in nursery in raw, moderately irrigated and shaded during winter. Germination starts between 1-4 months. About 15 cm tall seedlings are transplanted in the field with 3m spacing between rows and plants.

For propagation from stem cuttings, branches of healthy plants are cut into pieces of 12-15 cm each that include at least three nodes, and are planted in nurseries in the month of March. The saplings develop root between 3-5 months after which they are transplanted in the field.

The trees bear fruits after 2 years of plantation. The fruits collected during October seem to contain more essential oil. The fruits are shed dried before packaging and storing or transporting.

Methods of harvest: Fruits are handpicked. Often branches are cut to harvest fruits.

Primary processing: Fruits are shade-dried, occasionally sun-dried.

Principal constituents: Bark contains dictamnine, volatile oil and resin; fruits contain essential oil.

Principal threats: Depleting resources in the wild, commercial collection, household uses, increasing commercial demand, often destructive harvesting, etc.

 

5. Asparagus racemosus Willd.

Family: Liliaceae

Synonym:  Asparagus volubilis Buch.-Ham.

Common names: English: Wild asparagus
                          Nepali: Satawari, Kurilo
                          Hindi: Satawar
                          Sanskrit: Shatamuli

Distribution: Himalaya, India, Malaysia, Australia, Africa
Climate/vegetation zone: TR-TM (100-2100m) 

Habit: A tall, much branched climbing shrub with spiny stem
Habitat:  Open shrubberies, forest

Trade name: Satawari, Satawar, Kuril, Kurilo
Part used: Tubers     

Traditional medicinal uses: Tender shoots are considered refrigerant, demulcent, diuretic, antidiarrhoeal, galactagogue, and tonic. Tubers are used as an antipyretic, in nervous and rheumatic complaints, and in veterinary medicines.

Other uses: Tender shoots are cooked as vegetable.

Adulteration/substitution: Asparagus officinalis L., the cultivated species.

Asparagus can be propagated from seeds and from the adventitious roots.

Moist seeds are sown in nursery. Germination may take 3-5 weeks. When the seedlings attain the height of 15-20 cm, they are transplanted to the field in rows. The distance between the raw should be about 1-1.2m and plant to plant distance about 40-60 cm. Soil having 6-6.7 pH value is considered most suitable for the plant.

Adventitious roots, at least two pieces with juvenile shoot, can be used for propagation and sown directly in the field. This is done mostly during the harvesting procedure.
Method of harvest: Plants are uprooted to harvest tubers.

Primary processing: Tubers are washed, boiled in water, peeled the skin and sun-dried.

Principal constituents: Tubers contain sarsapogenin and glycoside.

Principal threats: Commercial harvesting, increasing demand, destructive harvesting, reducing resource base, habitat destruction, etc.

6. Phyllanthus emblica L.

Family: Euphorbiaceae

Synonyms:  Emblica officinalis Gaertn.
                   Phyllanthus taxifolius D. Don

Common names: English: Embelic myrobalan, Indian Gooseberry
                          Nepali: Amala
                          Hindi: Aonla, Amla
                          Sanskrit: Aamalaka, Adiphala, Dhaatri

Local names: Tigi (Gur.), Ghwarmeth (Mag.), Ambah (New.), Korosi (Rai), Meral (Sat.), Aonla (Tha.).

Distribution: India, Himalaya (Kumaon to Bhutan), Assam, N. Myanmar, S. China, Indo-China, Malaysia.

Climate/vegetation zone: TR-ST (up to 1800m)

Habit: Moderate sized deciduous tree up to 10m high.
Habitat: Broad-leaved forests, degraded forest, open places.

Trade name: Aonla
Part used: Leaves, fruits, seeds   

Traditional medicinal uses: Leaf juice – to relieve constipation; Fresh fruits – diuretic, laxative, stomachic, anthelmintic, in diarrhoea and dysentery. Dried fruits – in diarrhoea and dysentery and to relieve constipation. Seeds – endosperm is eaten to relieve headache.

Other uses: Fruits are eaten raw or cooked, also pickled or made into various types of foodstuffs.

Agro-techniques:

Indian gooseberry is usually propagated through seeds. Seeds are collected from mature fruits during October-February, cleaned and well dried. The seeds are sown in the nursery after soaking in water for some time during March. Seedlings are ready for transplantation during July.
Vegetative propagation can be done from stem cuttings. Woody stem are cut into about 20 cm pieces and sown in the nursery. After rooting and having 6-8 leaves, these are transplanted in the field maintaining a gap of about 4 m between plants.

Shield budding is done on one-year old seedlings with buds collected from superior strains yielding high quality fruits.

 

Methods of harvest: Fruits are manually picked up.

Primary processing: Fruits are boiled and seeds are separated before drying and storing.

Principal constituents: Fruit is rich source of vitamin C. Fruits, bark and leaves are rich in tannin. Seeds yield a fixed oil. Wood is used for agricultural implements, poles, etc.

Principal threats: Deforestation, habitat destruction, local uses of wood, etc.
 
7. Rauvolfia serpentina (L.) Benth. ex Kurz

Family: Apocynaceae

Synonyms: Ophioxylon serpentinum L.

Common names:  English: Serpentine
                           Nepali: Sarpagandha, Chandmaruwa
                           Hindi: Chandrabhaga, Chota-chand
                           Sanskrit: Sarpagangdha, Chandrika

Distribution: Tropical Himalaya, India, Sri lanka, Malaysia
Climate/vegetation zone: TR (upto 800m)

Habit: Small shrub
Habitat: On moist and shady places, in forest

Trade name: Sarpagandha, Chandmaruwa
Part used: Root

Traditional medicinal uses: Hypertensive, sedative, bowel complaints, diarrhoea and dysentery, antipyretic, uterine contraction, etc.

Agro-techniques:

The plant can be propagated either by seed, stem cutting or root cuttings.

Propagation from seeds: Seeds are soaked in water for 24 hours and sown in nurseries during May-June. Germination starts between 2-3 weeks and continues up to 4-6 weeks. Seedlings attaining the size of about 10-12 cm are ready for transplantation in July. Seedlings are transplanted in the field with 50 cm distance between rows and between plants.

Propagation from stem cuttings: In the month of May, hard woody stem is cut into about 20 cm pieces and planted in rows in sandy nursery and kept shaded and wet. The cuttings after 2-3 months are ready for transplantation in the irrigated field.

Propagation from root cuttings: About 5cm long root cuttings intact with a portion of stem above the collar are planted in nursery beds during March-April and kept moist. The cuttings begin to sprout between 3-4 weeks. These seedlings are transplanted, with 0.5 m row to row and 30 cm plant to plant distances, in irrigated fields.

Methods of harvest: Plants are uprooted to harvest root.

Primary processing: Roots are cleaned and sun-dried.

Principal constituents: Many alkaloids, reserpine being the most important.

Principal threats: Commercial harvesting of root, increasing market demand, high market value, shrinking resources base, habitat destruction, etc.

Conservation measures: CITES Appendix 2; Government of Nepal’s  Forest Act 1993 has prohibited the export of unprocessed root.


8. Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal

Family: Solanaceae

Common names:  English:
                           Nepali: Aswagandha
                           Hindi:   Asgandh
                           Sanskrit: Aswagandha

Distribution: Africa, Mediterranean region, south Asia.
Climate/vegetation zone: TR-ST (100-800m)

Habit: Branched under-shrub
Habitat: Drier tropical regions

Trade name: Aswagandha, Asgandh
Part used:  Root, leaves, fruit and seeds    

Traditional medicinal uses: Sedative, stimulant, aphrodisiac, anti-diabetic, tonic, etc.

Agro-techniques:
Withania somnifera is propagated from seeds. Seeds are usually sown in the nursery during June-July and well irrigated. The seedlings are generally ready for transplantation in the field after 4-5 weeks. The seedlings are planted in row having about 60 cm distances between rows and plants.

The crop grows well on sandy loam or light red soil, having pH 7.5-8.0 and needs good drainage system.

The crop is ready for harvesting during January-March, 5-6 months after transplantation.

Methods of harvest: Plants are uprooted and roots harvested.

Primary processing: Cleaned roots are chipped into 6-10 cm pieces and sun dried.

Principal constituents: withanolides and alkaloids including tropine, pseudotropine, etc.

Principal threats: Commercial harvesting, over harvesting, destructive harvesting, pre-mature harvesting, etc.

 

9. Carum carvi L.

Family: Umbelliferae

Common names:   English: Caraway

                               Nepali: Bhote jira

                               Hindi: Shia jira

                               Sanskrit: Sushavi

Trade name: Caraway, Kala jira

Part used: Fruits

Distribution: Himalaya (Kasmir-Bhutan), Tibet.

Climate/vegetation zone: TM-AL (2000-4000m)

Habit: Annual herb

Habitat: Open hill slopes

Traditional medicinal properties and uses: Carminative, stomachic, lactogague, in flatulence, colic, etc.

Other uses: Roots eaten as a vegetable, fruits as a spice, condiment and flavoring agent

Principal constituents: Essential oil (Oil of caraway)

Major formulations: Various Ayurvedic and other traditional medicinal preparations.

Adulteration and/or substitution:  Adulterated with certain Umbelliferous fruits

Propagation techniques: The plant can be propagated from seeds.

Harvesting technique:  Plants are uprooted or cut down to harvest fruits.

Primary processing: Seeds are sun-dried before storing.

Principal threats: Over-harvesting, destruction of habitat.

 

10. Saussurea costus L.

Family: Asteraceae

Synonym:       Saussurea lappa C.B. Clarke

                       Aucklandia costus Falc.

Common names:                   English: Costus, Kuth

                                                Nepali: Kuth

                                                Hindi: Kut, Kuth

                                                Sanskrit: Kushta

Trade name: Kuth

Part used: Root

Distribution: West Himalaya (Pakistan to Himanchal Pradesh)

Climate/vegetation zone: TM-SA (1800-3500m)

Habit: Annual herb

Habitat: Open hill slopes

Traditional medicinal properties and uses: Carminative, stomachic, tonic, stimulant, in flatulence, asthma, rheumatism and skin diseases

Other uses: Roots used as incense and insect repellant.

Principal constituents: Essential oil, an alkaloid-saussurine, a bitter resin, etc.

Major formulations: In a large number of Ayurvedic preparations.

Adulteration and/or substitution: Roots of other Saussurea species

Propagation techniques: Plants are propagated from seeds that are sown in nursery during April-May and transplanted after attaining the height of about 15cm.

Plants have also been reported to be propagated from tuberous root-cuttings.

Harvesting technique:  Plants are uprooted to harvest roots.

Primary processing: Roots, cut into pieces of about 10cm are sun-dried.

Productivity: About 250-300 kg of dry roots is obtained from a hectare of land.

Principal threats: Over-harvesting, destruction of habitat.

Recorded threat status:  CITES-Appendix I; Red List (Bot. Survey India)

 Conservation measures: CITES Appendix 2 

NATIONAL IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES

Bangladesh:

Nodal Agency: Ministry of Commerce, Government of Bangladesh, Dhaka
Contact Person: Mr. Amitava Chakraborty, Deputy Secretary

Partner 1:  Bangladesh Neem Foundation (BNF);
                Contact Address: House No # 497, Road No # 33
                New DOHS, Mohakhali; Dhaka - 1206, Bangladesh
                Phone: 880-2-8856894; Fax: 880-2-8815281
                Emails:
iinh@gnbd.net  Web: www.neem-bd.org

Contact Person:  Dr. Hakim Mondal, Chairman

Partner 2:  DEBTEC - Development of Biotechnology & Environmental
                Conservation Centre
                Hs # 90, Rd # 11/A, Dhanmondi R/A, Dhaka 1209, Bangladesh; 
                Phone: 880-2-8114827, 0171184166
                Fax: 880-2-8115155;
                Web Site:
www.debtec.org; Email: debtec@gmail.com

Contact Person: Dr. Ferdousi Begum, Executive Director


Bhutan: 

Nodal Agency: Ministry of Debt and Aid Management, Royal Government of Bhutan, Thimpu, Bhutan

Partner:  Medicinal & Aromatic Plants Program; Renewable Natural Resources Research Centre (RNRRC), Ministry of Agriculture, Yusipang, Bhutan
  
Contact Address:  Medicinal & Aromatic Plants Program
                           Renewable Natural Resources Research Centre (RNRRC),
                           Ministry of Agriculture, Royal Government of Bhutan
                           PO Box-252, Thimpu, Bhutan
                           Phone: 975-1-7606964
                           Fax: 00975-2-321601
                           Email:
tshitila@druknet.bt Web Site: www.moa.gov.bt

Contact Person: Mr. Tshitila, Research Officer 


Nepal:

Organization: Herbs & NTFP Coordination Committee (HNCC), Ministry of Forests and Soil Conservation (MFSC), Government of Nepal

Contact Address:        HNCC Secretariat
                                 Dept of Plant Resources
                                 PO Box 2270; Thapathali, Kathmandu
                                 Nepal
                                 Phone: 977-1-4251160
                                 Fax: 977-1-4251141
                                 Email:
herbsntfp@wlink.com.np, banaspati@flora.wlink.com.np

Contact Person: Dr. Lokendra Raj Sharma, Member Secretary

CFC CONTACTS:

Ms. Verena Adler
Common Fund for Commodities (CFC)
Stadhouderskade 55
1072AB Amsterdam
P.O. Box 74656
The Netherlands
Tel: (31-20) 5754954
Fax: (31-20) 6760231
Email:
Verena.Adler@common-fund.org

Mr. Julius Nwankpa
Common Fund for Commodities (CFC)
Stadhouderskade 55
1072AB Amsterdam
P.O. Box 74656
The Netherlands
Tel: (31-20) 5754955
Fax: (31-20) 6760231
Email:
Julius.Nwankpa@common-fund.org

 

FAO CONTACT:

 

Mr. Kaison Chang
Secretary
Sub-Group on Tropical Fruits
Intergovernmental Group on Banana and Tropical fruits
Commodities and Trade Division
Vaile delle Termi di Caracalla
FAO, 00100 Rome
Italy
Phone: +39 0657054346
Fax: +39 0657054495
Email:
Kaison.Chang@FAO.Org

 

MAPPA- HVPs/VC- TEAM AT ICIMOD

Dr. Giridhar A. Kinhal

Team Leader

AA: High Value Products/Value Chain (HVPs/VC)

 Sustainable Livelihoods & Poverty Reduction (SLPR)

International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD)
Khumaltar, Lalitpur
P.O. Box 3226, Kathmandu, Nepal
Telephone: 977-1-5003222
Fax: 977-1-5003299, 5003277
Email: gkinhal@icimod.org

Dr. Nirmal Bhattarai
MAPs Specialist
International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD)
Khumaltar, Lalitpur
P.O. Box 3226, Kathmandu, Nepal
Telephone: 977-1-5003222

Fax: 977-1-5003299, 5003277
Email:
nbhattarai@icimod.org

Mr. Dyutiman Choudhary
Enterprise Specialist
International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD)
Khumaltar, Lalitpur
P.O. Box 3226, Kathmandu, Nepal
Telephone: 977-1-5003222
Fax: 977-1-5003299, 5003277
Email: dchoudhary@icimod.org

Ms. Rabina G. Rasaily

Programme Associate

International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD)
Khumaltar, Lalitpur
P.O. Box 3226, Kathmandu, Nepal
Telephone: 977-1-5003222
Fax: 977-1-5003299, 5003277

Email: rarasaily@icimod.org

 

 



© ICIMOD 2007. All Rights Reserved.
 
MAPPA is a network of development partners hosted by ICIMOD and supported by IDRC, The Ford Foundation and IFAD.
G.P.O. Box: 3226, Kathmandu, Nepal Tel: 977 -1 - 5003222, Fax: 977 -1 - 5003299, 5003277 Email: mappa@icimod.org
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